YORUBA DRESSING : THE TYPES, WAYS AND DRESSING OF THE YORUBA TRIBE IN NIGERIA

January 01, 2019

photos of yoruba dressings
Image source: buzznigeria.com

The Yoruba have legendary types of clothes that make them distinct from other cultures around them. Here in this post, I will be exposing you to various ways and tyypes of yoruba dressing. The yoruba take immense pride in their attire, for which they are well known for. Clothing materials traditionally come from processed cotton by traditional weavers. They believe that the type of clothes worn by a man depicts his personality and social status, and that different occasions require different clothing and dressing outfits.

Typically, The Yoruba have a very wide range of materials used to make clothing, the most basic being the Aṣo-Oke, which is a hand loomed cloth of different patterns and colors sewn into various styles and which comes in very many different colors and patterns. Aso Oke comes in three major styles based on pattern and coloration;

TYPES OF YORUBA DRESSING CLOTHINGS


Alaari – a rich red Aṣọ-Oke,
Sanyan- a brown and usual light brown Aṣọ-Oke, and
Ẹtu- a dark blue Aṣọ-Oke.
Other clothing materials include but are not limited to:

YORU DRESSING - OFI


Ofi- pure white yarned cloths, used as cover cloth, it can be sewn and worn.
Aran- a velvet clothing material of silky texture sewn into Danṣiki and Kẹmbẹ, worn by the rich.
Adirẹ- cloth with various patterns and designs, dye in indigo ink (Ẹlu or Aro).

Agbada clothing historically worn by the Yoruba

Man in basic Yoruba traditional regalia
Clothing in Yoruba culture is gender sensitive. For men's' wear, they have Bùbá, Esiki and Sapara, which are regarded as Èwù Àwòtélè or under wear, while they also have Dandogo, Agbádá, Gbariye, Sulia and Oyala, which are also known as Èwù Àwòlékè / Àwòsókè or over wears. Some fashionable men may add an accessory to the Agbádá outfit in the form of a wraparound (Ìbora).[98][99]

Ìrùkèrè made from horse or cow tail
They also have various types of Sòkòtò or native trousers that are sown alongside the above-mentioned dresses. Some of these are Kèmbè (Three-Quarter baggy pants), Gbáanu, Sóóró (Long slim / streamlined pants), Káamu & Sòkòtò Elemu. A man’s dressing is considered incomplete without a cap (Fìlà). Some of these caps include, but are not limited to; Gobi (Cylindrical, which when worn may be compressed and shaped forward, sideways, or backward), Tinko, Abetí-ajá (Crest-like shape which derives its name from its hanging flaps that resembles a dog's hanging ears. The flaps can be lowered to cover the ears in cold weather, otherwise, they are upwardly turned in normal weather), Alagbaa, Oribi, Bentigoo, Onide, and Labankada (A bigger version of the Abetí-ajá, and is worn in such a way as to reveal the contrasting color of the cloth used as underlay for the flaps).

Women also have different types of dresses. The most commonly worn are Ìró (wrapper) and Bùbá (blouse–like loose top). Women also have matching Gèlè (head gear) that must be put on whenever the Ìró and Bùbá is on. Just as the cap (Fìlà) is important to men, women’s dressing is considered incomplete without Gèlè. It may be of plain cloth or costly as the women can afford. Apart from this, they also have ìborùn (Shawl) and Ìpèlé (which are long pieces of fabric that usually hang on the left shoulder and stretch from the hind of the body to the fore). At times, it is tied round their waists over the original one piece wrapper. Unlike men, women have two types of under wears (Èwù Àwòtélè), called; Tòbi and Sinmí. Tòbi is like the modern day apron with strings and spaces in which women can keep their valuables. They tie the tòbi around the waists before putting on the Ìró (wrapper). Sinmí is like a sleeveless T-shirt that is worn under before wearing any other dress on the upper body.

There are many types of beads (Ìlèkè), hand laces, necklaces (Egba orùn), anklets (Egba esè) and bangles (Egba owó) that are abound in Yoruba land, that both males and females put on for bodily adornment. Chiefs, Priests, kings or people of royal descent, especially use some of these beads, often. Some of these beads include Iyun, Lagidigba, Àkún etc. An accessory especially popular among royalty and titled Babalawos / Babalorishas is the Ìrùkèrè, which is an artistically processed animal tail, a type of Fly-whisk. The horsetail whiskers are symbols of authority and stateliness. It can be used in a shrine for decoration but most often is used by chief priests and priestess as a symbol of their authority or Ashe.[100] As most men go about with their hair lowly cut or neatly shaven every time, the reverse is the case with women. Hair is considered the ' Glory of the woman '. They usually take care of their hair in two major ways; They plait and they weave. There are many types of plaiting styles, and women readily pick any type they want. Some of these include kòlésè, Ìpàkó-elédè, Sùkú, Kojúsóko, Alágogo, Konkoso, Etc. Traditionally, The Yoruba consider tribal marks ways of adding beauty to the face of individuals. This is apart from the fact that they show clearly from which part of Yorubaland an individual comes from, since different areas are associated with different marks. Different types of tribal marks are made with local blades or knives on the cheeks. These are usually done at infancy, when children are not pain conscious. Some of these tribal marks include Pélé, Abàjà-Ègbá, Abàjà-Òwu, Abàjà-mérin, Kéké, Gòmbò, Ture, Pélé Ifè, Kéké Òwu, Pélé Ìjèbú etc. This practice has almost faded into oblivion.[101]

The Yoruba believe that development of a nation is akin to the development of a man or woman. Therefore, the personality of an individual has to be developed in order to fulfill his or her responsibilities. Clothing among the Yoruba people is a crucial factor upon which the personality of an individual is anchored. This belief is anchored in Yoruba proverbs. Different occasions also require different outfits among the Yoruba. 

So here in this post we have listed different types of yoruba dressing for both male and female. No doubt nigerian tribes are very rich clothings and fashion and there are various types of clothings if you want one. 

  Article source: Nairaland.com
YORUBA DRESSING : THE TYPES, WAYS AND DRESSING OF THE YORUBA TRIBE IN NIGERIA YORUBA DRESSING :  THE TYPES, WAYS AND DRESSING OF THE YORUBA TRIBE IN NIGERIA Reviewed by Jikola ken on January 01, 2019 Rating: 5

Nigerian Traditional Wedding: How Its Done In Nigeria, Customs And Traditions

January 01, 2019

HOW NIGERIAN TRADITIONAL WEDDING ARE DONE IN NIGERIA


Have you withnessed or been  to a nigerian traditional wedding before? 

I know you should have attended a traditional wedding in nigeria before or if its the other way round, don't worry as i will just be covering every detail you would want to know about about a nigerian traditional wedding. 

Nigerian traditional weddings are beautiful ceremonies to attend because of the things that come with it. The blaring music, different types of foods and drinks, the accessories and clothings that are worn to such occassions. Without much further ado nigerian traditional weddings are one of such ceremonies that shows the rich culture and heritage of the nigerian population.  

We have so many tribes in nigeria with different culture and traditions, and it isn't different when it comes to nigerian traditional weddings. So I will be talking about each tribe and how their traditional wedding  are carried out and executed. 

Though these events with trends that are going on, they are   now becoming tedious and expensive to run, but nevertheless they are fun filled and enjoyable.

With the groom and bride bringing their two families close together, it helps for understanding the traditions, culture and values of both of the families. 

The various display nigerian traditional wedding attires, nigerian wedding color combinations, wedding dressing styles, wedding customs and traditions are what makes this event so glamorous. 

HOW A NIGERIAN TRADITIONAL WEDDING IS PERFORMED, CUSTOMS AND TRADITIONS



There are rules, traditions,  culture and rights when it comes to nigerian traditional weddings. Each of the stated above are different in all tribes with every tribe having its own style of doing things. Now let's take a look at the yoruba, Igbo and Hausa tribe. 

NIGERIAN TRADITIONAL WEDDING - YORUBA TRIBE CUSTOMS AND TRADITIONS

nigerian traditional wedding photos



First and foremost the yoruba traditional wedding  is characterized with the grooms family paying the brides family a visit to seek for the brides hand in marriage. 

The first step is the groom choosing a woman he wants to marry and after then a middleman(alarina) is called upon and he starts the marriage process formally by inquiring into the family of the supposed bride.
After this, a meeting is fixed and it begins with courting. Another meeting is fixed between both families and the groom is given a list of items called ‘Eru Iyawo’ which includes the dowry to be paid at the day of the wedding ceremony. Items like yam,  palm oil, sugar cane, obi(kolanut),  atare( alligator pepper), honey, fruits, orogbo(bitter kola), cow and goat meat are basic items that are always present in the list and other items including the dowry. 

On the day of the yoruba traditional wedding, the program which is usually headed by two people that is the Alaga Ijoko for the bride’s family and the Alaga Iduro or the groom’s family starts off with the entrance of the groom and  his people. 
The ceremony for the Yoruba traditional wedding  a time to unite two individuals and also an avenue for the both families to know each other. 
Following the formal introduction, a date is set for the engagement. The celebration is moderated by two women Alaga Ijoko (representing the brides family) and Alaga Iduro (groom’s family). Traditional weddings by the Yorubas begin with the arrival of the groom’s family. The grooms family must come early or they are asked to pay a fine.  The families stretch forth their hands to pray for the groom who prostrates with his friends before heading to his seat.
An elaborate proposal ‘letter’ is presented by the grooms family and read by the youngest member of the brides family. An acceptance letter is given by the brides familyto the grooms.  The ‘veiled’ bride dances into the hall with her friends (Asoebi Ladies). She kneels before her parents then the groom’s parents for prayers. She proceeds to put the groom’s hat (Fila) on his head demonstrating her acceptance of his proposal.
The Yoruba men wear an agbada a two-layered material made from  aso oke for yoruba wedding (traditional/hand-woven material), cotton, damask, lace or wax fabric (ankara). The colour combination complements the bride’s and reflects the colour chosen by his family. The bride’s outfit consists of Gele (head tie), Buba (blouse), Iro (wrapper) usually ankle length as well as accessories.
Various foods like jollof rice, pounded yam and egusi, 

NIGERIAN TRADITIONAL WEDDING - HAUSA TRIBE CUSTOMS AND TRADITION


nigerian traditional wedding photos


Taking  a wife in hausa land usually begins with what is known as ”Na gani ina” meaning , i like what i see . At this stage the grooms family and friends accompany the groom to visit the family of the bride ,this is usually an all men affair, the family and friends( men only) take with them some gifts to the bride’s parents house ,fruits and kolanut must be included. The gifts can either be accepted or rejected by the brides’s father. If the gifts  are accepted by the brides father the groom is then permitted to see the bride.
The groom to be and the girl are now allowed to get to know each other’s likes and dislikes, after this if the girl feels comfortable with marrying the man she gives her consent. The bride’s parents now have the duty of communicating the approval to the grooms family. this is known as ”Gaisuwa” then the couple are now engaged. Both families will then sit to have a dialogue on wedding arrangements and setting of wedding date. The setting of the wedding date is known as ”Sa rana”.
The wedding day is called ”Fatihah”,on that day the dowry ”sadaki” is paid. While the dowry is paid, the bride stays inside with older women and her friends .The3 older women are there to carry out aa ceremony called ”Kunshi” this is to prepare the bride top become a wife. It can also be called bridal shower .Generous amount of perfume and scented flowers are applied on the bride. Lalei (Henna) is also applied on her arms and feet they are usually made in unique an intriguing designs.


NIGERIAN TRADITIONAL WEDDING - IGBO TRIBE CUSTOMS AND TRADITION


Igbo traditional wedding photos

Igba Nkwu’ meaning Wine carrying is the official traditional wedding ceremony practised by the Igbos. Before getting to this stage, the groom-to-be’s family pays a visit to the Bride’s family in an act called ‘door knocking’. This is done as an act of asking the parent of the bride for her hand in marriage. The groom-to-be’s family presents Kolanut, Palmwine (local brew), dry gin and soft drinks to the bride’s family. After the purpose of visit and gifts are accepted, some families go-ahead to investigate each other for their good standing and moral standing in the society.
The Igbo women wear different styled embodied tops over two George wrappers (Akwele), a headgear (gele) and coral beads for the traditional wedding ceremony. Others use the ‘George fabric’ to make a long dress and style their heads with coral beads. The isi-agu top paired with the George wrapper, a cap, and a walking stick is worn by the men.
The main ceremony begins with lots of preparation. The food and drinks often locally made. Dishes like Ofe-Nsala, Nkwobi, Isiewu, Okpa, Pepper soup coupled with drinks like Palmwine, dry gin etc.
The Bride carries freshly tapped palm wine in a ceremony called ‘Igba Nkwu’ as she weaves through the crowd in search of her groom amidst feign distraction from the crowd of men. On getting to her groom she kneels and gives him the wine, the groom drinks up the content signifying acceptance. 

They proceed to dance to meet parents for prayers and formal introduction. Igbo people will most likely go back to their hometown ahead of the ceremony but these days most people would rather rent event venues and bring the culture to the city they are.
We have been able to discuss nigerian traditional wedding as regards to three major tribes in nigeria. I will be rounding up my post here on traditional weddings in nigeria here. 
Though I will still be touching other areas that has to do with nigerian traditional wedding in my future post. 

To get the updates as they come,  do well to subscribe to my Email list. 
Thank you. 

Nigerian Traditional Wedding: How Its Done In Nigeria, Customs And Traditions Nigerian Traditional Wedding: How Its Done In Nigeria, Customs And Traditions Reviewed by Jikola ken on January 01, 2019 Rating: 5

HELLO IN NIGERIAN: HOW TO SAY HELLO IN NIGERIAN LANGUAGES

December 07, 2018
people saying hello in Nigerian languages


With an alledged population of about 180 million people in nigeria, with different cultures, speaking different languages and eating different foods, there is a need for a basic form of conversing with each other, and the least place you can start is by greeting each other which brings me to the word how to say hello in Nigerian languages

Read Now: OWE YORUBA (YORUBA PROVERBS), ITS USAGES, ENGLISH MEANINGS AND LESSONS (Best Article)

how to say hello in Nigerian language



In your place of work, there is a need for it. In social settings there is a need for it. You meet someone for the first time that you probably would want to keep up with, you need it.  

Infact there is no doubt to the fact that it is one of the most important basic social skills we have to develop. 

So if what brought you here is to learn "how to say hello in Nigerian languages"? 
or
"how to greet in Nigerian languages(yoruba, igbo, hausa,)"? 
or 
"how to say how are you in Nigerian languages"? 

then I will advise you to stay put and don't click the back button because I will be sharing various ways you can "say hello to a Nigerian" easily and fast😁. 

But before I proceed to list them below, i will like to clarify something here, there is one thing you must take note of here, and it is that:
Some of these languages don't have a particular way of saying the said phrases that brought you here: an example is the yoruba language, however there are different ways we can utter this phrases and in different situations. 
So I bring to you below the various ways of saying "hello in Nigerian languages”. 


HOW TO SAY HELLO IN YORUBA LANGUAGE


Bawo ni - how are you? 
This is literally translated as "how are you" and can be used when initiating conversations with your circles or younger ones. One does not use this phrase when referring to an older or elderly one, whoever does that will be termed disrespectful. 

E nle Ma / E nle Sir
This  phrase is a much proper word to use when you are referring to elders. One uses this  word to substitute for Bawo ni because it sounds more respectful. 


chiefs greeting in Nigerian languages


E rora Ma / E rora Sir
This is another proper word to use for elders. It is generally accepted way of greeting elders in the yoruba tribe. 
Other ways of greeting are:
e rora ma, e rora sir, e ku ikale ma, e Ku ikale sir. 



HOW TO SAY HELLO IN IGBO LANGUAGE



kedu- "hello"
Kedu literally translates to hello or how are you I Igbo language. It is the general phrase used by the Igbo tribe when saying hello in Igbo language. It can be used in different setting both formal and informal. 

Other words are: kedu Ka odi,  ole nke na eme, ke kwanu. 


HOW TO SAY HELLO IN HAUSA LANGUAGE


Sannu- hello
This word sannu is a general way of saying hello or how are you in Hausa language. It is used by the predominantly Hausa  tribe in the northern part of Nigeria. 
Other words are: Ina kwana,  Ina yinni. 

Meisere- hello
It is the ibibio way of expressing the word hello in ibibio. This is commonly used by the Erik/ibibio tribe in nigeria. 
Other phrases are: Abadie,  ide mfo. 

Koyo
This phrase is commonly used by the benin tribe in Nigeria. It is the phrase of hello or how are you. It can be used in different social settings. 

Mavo
Mavo is the phrase for hello or how are you in urhobo. It is used by the urhobo tribe in Nigeria. 
It can be used in both formal and informal settings. 


Abole-
Abole is used by the idoma tribe in Nigeria. it is used when saying hello in idoma language. 

Ado
Ado is spoken as hello  by the  ijaw tribe in nigeria. It is the general way of saying how are in ijaw tribe.

How far 
How far is commonly used in nigeria by the Nigerian. It is the simplest and common way of saying how are you in Nigerian pidgin. 
Everybody understands this phrase in nigeria and it is generally accepted everywhere. 

I will be concluding my article on how to say hello in Nigerian language or ways to say hello to a Nigerian. There are so many that haven't been listed here and if we are to list them all here, we are not gonna get this done with on this post. 

The good thing is am going to be updating this post regularly, so if you wish to get more updates on it, you can subscribe to get updates. 

Thank you




HELLO IN NIGERIAN: HOW TO SAY HELLO IN NIGERIAN LANGUAGES HELLO IN NIGERIAN: HOW TO SAY HELLO IN NIGERIAN LANGUAGES Reviewed by Jikola ken on December 07, 2018 Rating: 5

OWE YORUBA (YORUBA PROVERBS), ITS USAGES, ENGLISH MEANINGS AND LESSONS (Best Article)

December 02, 2018

owe yoruba(yoruba proverbs and its usages)
  So I present to you this interesting topic on yoruba proverbs(owe yoruba), indeed the Nigerian culture is very much vast and wide with each tribes having its own laws and traditions. But nevertheless,  we still have the dominant tribes which are the hausas,  yorubas,  and  Igbo. 

Read more: How To Say Hello In Nigerian (Easiest Way)

These three tribes are mostly the most populous in Nigeria with each having its own tradition, customs and way of doing things. 

In this post I will be talking about the yoruba proverbs(owe) . The yorubas are very rich in proverbs(owe)  and it is one of the ways you can recognise them. The role that proverbs play in the yoruba tribe cant be underestimated as it is used a lot by the elderly people. 

Gosh!  I  remember those warnings my mum regularly dished to me when I tresspassed set limits.  The way she says it and oh how beautifully it is pronounced to my stretching ears.  

Lest I not derail from the topic being discussed I will be showing you the owe yoruba (you should know what this means already) and its various meaning in no time. 
So stay calm while you read and enjoy. 

YORUBA PROVERBS (OWE YORUBA) ITS MEANINGS AND THEIR USAGES. 

1. OWE YORUBA: Ti owo omo re bo aso.
     Translation: It means for someone to take caution when he is doing something bad. It is usually said as a caution to warn someone who is doing the wrong thing. 

2. OWE YORUBA: Bi ewure ba wo ile alagidi,  enu ona laa ti pada leyin re, bi be ko, iya ti alagidi b'afi je ewure,  a pada sole si ori eni na. 

     Translation: Never chase a goat to the house of the stubborn one,  or else the punishment meant for the goat will be meter on you. 

3. OWE YORUBA: Omo atiro (leper) to ra bata ese kan fun iya,  Oro lo fe gbo. 

      Translation: A child that buys a single footwear for his disabled mother, wants to hear words from her. 

4. OWE YORUBA: Melo ni eera to wo wipe aran yo oun lenu. 

    Translation: How big is an ant that it is complaining of stomach worms. This is usually said to young ones who are complaining of too much responsibilities. 

5. OWE YORUBA: Ile ti aba fi ito Mon, Iri ni yo wo. 

     Translation: The house that is built with saliva,  will fall down when dew sets upon it. This means that one should build a strong foundation upon whatever he does or else he will get disappointed. 

6. OWE YORUBA: ko si eni ti o f'obe to nu je isu. 

    Translation: Nobody will admit the crime done, when the consequences rears its head. 

7. OWE YORUBA: Fi woroko se Ada. 

    Translation: Take a bold step to make a change. 

8. OWE YORUBA: Aaye laa j'ogun ore, b' oba ku tan, ogun Ko se je. 

    Translation: You can only inherit a living friend when he is alive, after his death, you are an unlikely heir. This meant to strike while the iron is hot. The living represents opportunities that are for the taking, and when you lose them you can't get them back. 

9. OWE YORUBA: Ase gbe kan kan kosi, ase pamo lowa. 

    Translation: No evil done can be hidden forever,  rather it will come back to hunt you. This means that everybody will reap the fruit of his evil deeds. 

10. OWE YORUBA: Bi oju ba ri, enu a dake. 

       Translation: Not everything seen by the eyes should be spoken. 

11. OWE YORUBA: Omo to ni iya re ko ni sun, oun na ka foju b' orun. 
        Translation: A child who doesn't obey the parents,  won't be spared the rod. 

12. OWE YORUBA: Ohun ti ase ti ile fi J'ona, aye ma gbo. 

     . Translation: All evil that has been done secretly will be made glared to the public. 

13.  OWE YORUBA: Iroyin, ko to afoju ba,  eni ba de ibe lo le so. 

        Translation: A person who isn't there can't tell a story of what happened, its the one that is there when it happened that will. 

14. OWE YORUBA: Oju mewa,  ko le Jo oju eni. 

       Translation: Ones eyes is better than ten eyes combined.  
15. OWE YORUBA: Taa ba tori isu je epo,  aa tori epo je isu. 

Translation: if one doesn't want to eat yam because of oil,  one will because of oil eat a yam. 
It means doing something because of another. 

Wrapping up this article on owe yoruba(yoruba proverbs). 
I have been able to list some of them here in this post, however there are many of them which I wouldn't even be able to mention if given a whole day(its a full book on its own). I will be updating this post on yoruba proverbs  regularly so keep checking in for more updates. 

If you found this article helpful,  do well to share this post. 





OWE YORUBA (YORUBA PROVERBS), ITS USAGES, ENGLISH MEANINGS AND LESSONS (Best Article) OWE YORUBA (YORUBA PROVERBS), ITS USAGES, ENGLISH  MEANINGS AND LESSONS (Best Article) Reviewed by Jikola ken on December 02, 2018 Rating: 5
Powered by Blogger.